Come ci spiega Bennato: “Gli scenari problematici sono due: la privacy e la sicurezza. Il primo punto è una conseguenza del monitoraggio. Se un oggetto IoT produce dati, questi potrebbero essere relativi a persone e al loro utilizzo. La manipolazione di queste informazioni ricadrebbe nel discusso campo della trasparenza e trattamento dei dati personali. La sicurezza è invece una conseguenza del controllo: se qualunque oggetto può essere comandato a distanza, potrebbe anche essere attaccato da criminali informatici. (via La Stampa - Cos’è l’Internet delle cose?)

Come ci spiega Bennato: “Gli scenari problematici sono due: la privacy e la sicurezza. Il primo punto è una conseguenza del monitoraggio. Se un oggetto IoT produce dati, questi potrebbero essere relativi a persone e al loro utilizzo. La manipolazione di queste informazioni ricadrebbe nel discusso campo della trasparenza e trattamento dei dati personali. La sicurezza è invece una conseguenza del controllo: se qualunque oggetto può essere comandato a distanza, potrebbe anche essere attaccato da criminali informatici. (via La Stampa - Cos’è l’Internet delle cose?)

newsweek
newsweek:

The 20-Year-Old Ebola Treatment That Could Save Kent Brantly

The devastation wrought by the worst recorded Ebola outbreak in history grows daily. As of Thursday, the deaths totalled 729 deaths in West Africa, according to the World Health Organization (WHO), but it’s far from over; ”Ebola is worsening in West Africa,” CDC director Tom Frieden said not once, or twice, but three times on Thursday.

Infectious disease experts are mobilizing, borders are shutting down, and, despite the fact that there is no cure for Ebola haemorrhagic fever (the illness caused by Ebola virus infection), health care officials are trying anything they can to help the stricken—especially those who put themselves at risk to save others. That means digging deep into the list of experimental methods the WHO, CDC and others have developed over the past few years to cure the deadly viral infection—including a simple but controversial therapy called immune plasma infusion.

In Monrovia, Liberia, 33-year old Dr. Kent Brantly of Forth Worth, Texas had been treating Ebola patients since June, as part of an international relief group called Samaritan’s Purse. But in mid-July, Brantly recognized that he himself was showing symptoms of Ebola. He isolated himself, and told the rest of the team of his suspicions; soon after, his diagnosis was confirmed.

newsweek:

The 20-Year-Old Ebola Treatment That Could Save Kent Brantly

The devastation wrought by the worst recorded Ebola outbreak in history grows daily. As of Thursday, the deaths totalled 729 deaths in West Africa, according to the World Health Organization (WHO), but it’s far from over; ”Ebola is worsening in West Africa,” CDC director Tom Frieden said not once, or twice, but three times on Thursday.

Infectious disease experts are mobilizing, borders are shutting down, and, despite the fact that there is no cure for Ebola haemorrhagic fever (the illness caused by Ebola virus infection), health care officials are trying anything they can to help the stricken—especially those who put themselves at risk to save others. That means digging deep into the list of experimental methods the WHO, CDC and others have developed over the past few years to cure the deadly viral infection—including a simple but controversial therapy called immune plasma infusion.

In Monrovia, Liberia, 33-year old Dr. Kent Brantly of Forth Worth, Texas had been treating Ebola patients since June, as part of an international relief group called Samaritan’s Purse. But in mid-July, Brantly recognized that he himself was showing symptoms of Ebola. He isolated himself, and told the rest of the team of his suspicions; soon after, his diagnosis was confirmed.